• “hopeful monsters”: the products of Jackson’s “broken world thinking: “It is as if perspicacity in design demands the ability to see the built environment not as a coherent whole, but as a scrapyard of materials that invite radical recombination. This ‘broken world thinking,’ to invoke Steven Jackson’s term (2014), is profoundly inventive, allowing us to imagine rich counterfactual alternatives to reality” (163).
  • “The common thread running through all the examples I have offered thus far is an emphasis on subjunctive knowledge—knowledge about what might have been or could be or almost was. This subjunctive imagination underwrites both humanistic and scientific endeavors” (163).
  • “A ‘fault line,’ as understood here, is a break—either conceptual or physical—that divides an event or object into two or more parts” (163).
  • “diegetic prototype,” a device made for a fictional world that then prompts later real-world development (167).
  • “The case study of the Whereabouts Clock illustrates the value of fault lines as a resource for both analysis and design. Because one of the key functions such fissures perform is the delineation of parts, any full-fledged methodology of fault lines will need to include a theory of parts and their relationship to one another. Whether it is the fragments of speculative design or the heritable and distorted traits of conjectural criticism, parthood figures prominently in each case” (169).
  • “One premise of this project is that books—like other physical objects—are already lo-fi sensors in their natural state, detecting and reacting to information about external stimuli and events. A moldy book, for example, registers the fact that there is excess moisture in the air through a multimodal output that takes the form of a musty odor and foxing stains. A book read by candlelight is likely to retain telltale traces of wax on its pages” (171).

  • Link Kraus’ work to Sheldon but also the more variegated approaches in Tsing et al..
  • I value Kari’s work not just because she’s a wildly original thinker but also because, through the work of design, she produces speculative and subjunctive knowledge in concert with materials themselves. This is a vital bridge from the arts practice dimensions of media archaeology to the speculative philosophies necessary (I think) for rewriting life in the Anthropocene. Through links to care and repair of systems as well as objects, we can also link her lab-based work to those with more infrastructural orientations.
  • Also, while this essay does not directly address politics as such, it develops a rich sense of an ethics of objects—what the object-oriented perspective actually entails vis-a-vis ethical and moral obligations when producing design—a question that is of vital importance as the tech industry more broadly spins out and destroys itself.