[I’m reading this one quickly and on paper so there aren’t going to be lots of notes.]

  • “Introduction,” Menely and Oak-Taylor
    • Two main things come to mind: 1) the characterization of the Anthropocene as a “geologic” time and the attendant emphasis on stratigraphy as the scientific counterpoint for a literary practice (over and against other kinds of scientific knowing); and 2) the occasion of the Anthropocene for working out broader methodological anxieties about the state of literary studies more generally.
  • “Anarky,” Cohen
    • Retitle “Against Periodization.” Anthropocene as an opportunity to break down literary periods, or better to see them as always already broken down; figure of the “whorl” or “vortex,” circling back on itself.
  • “Enter Anthropocene,” Mentz
    • A deeply tedious essay reading punctuation against the 1610 Orbis spike hypothesis. Effectively a counter to Cohen’s anarchy; re-insisting on the value of periodization.
  • “The Anthropocene Reads Buffon,” Heringman
    • Reading nineteenth century “geological romances” against contemporary popular science: similar tropes and concerns. Romance is improbable and situates humans w/i deep time.
  • “Punctuating History,” Ford
    • How to read Romantic texts as Anthropocenic? The two are synonymous though never more than mutual metaphors; Romanticism’s claims about the value of literature as a collapse of natural/synthetic aesthetics maps onto Anthropocene.
  • “Romancing the Trace,” Luciano
    • Reading Hitchcock’s fossil poems against new materialism, less to develop a politics and more a new way of engaging the world (but what is the difference?). I have trouble following this essay at parts.
  • “Partial Readings,” Chow
    • Building a practice of “critical partiality” through a reading of Thoreau’s posthumous writings.
  • “Scale as Form,” Morgan
    • We can address scale by returning to formalism: this essay continues this volume’s obsession w/ nineteenth century geologists (is our field just mostly long nineteenth century ppl??).
  • “Anthropocene Interruptions,” Neuman