• “Under what conditions might it be said that certain events cannot be represented? Under what conditions can an unrepresentable phenomenon of this kind be given a specific conceptual shape?” (109). Rancière working against an “inflated” notion of the unrepresentable.
  • What does unrepresentability mean?
    • “First, that it is impossible to make the essential character of the thing in question present” (109–10). An issue of “material presentation” adequate to the regime of art.
    • “The second, by contrast, challenges art’s exercise of its power. It says that a thing cannot be represented by artistic means on account of the very nature of those means, of three characteristic properties of artistic presentation,” which are: 1) “a surplus of presence,” 2) “a status of unreality,” and 3) “a specific mode of address tht delivers the thing represented over to affects . . . which are incompatible with the gravity of the experience it contains” (110).
  • In order to address the imagined-unrepresentable, art deploys the unadored “witness’ narrative” or the “sublime” (111).
    • “On the one hand, [this regime] argues for the internal impossibility of representation . . . On the other hand, it argues for its indignity” (111).